Surveillance

Infectious diseases remain the commonest health problem with high prevalence and burden resulting in huge social, economic and quality of life losses globally. Surveillance on infectious diseases is an epidemiological practice through systematic collection, analysis, and interpretation of data that provides real time notification to decision makers on health problems. The main role of disease surveillance is to predict, observe, and minimize the harm caused by outbreak, epidemic, and pandemic situations, as well as increase knowledge about which factors contribute to such circumstances. A key part of modern disease surveillance is the practice of disease case reporting. With the advent of modern communication technology, this has changed dramatically. There are different types of strategies to meet the surveillance. 1) Sentinel surveillance systems consist of health facilities or laboratories in selected locations that report all cases of a certain condition to indicate trends in the entire population. Sample reporting is a good way to use limited resources to monitor suspected health problems. Examples include networks of health providers reporting cases of certain bacterial infections among children. 2) Household surveys can be used to monitor diseases if the surveys are consistent and repeated periodically. The surveys are population-based; that is, they select a random sample of household’s representative of the whole population. Examples include demographic and health surveys in developing countries. 3) Laboratory-based surveillance is used to detect and monitor infectious diseases. For example, for food-borne diseases such as salmonella, the use of a central laboratory to identify specific strains of bacteria allows more rapid and complete identification of disease outbreaks than a system that relies on reporting of syndromes from clinics. 4) Integrated disease surveillance and response (IDSR) strategies bring together data from health facilities and laboratories. It is a critical tool to prevent outbreaks of diseases and develop appropriate, rapid responses when diseases begin to spread.

Accelerated Development and Introduction Plans (ADIPs) for Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccines: Burden of Pneumococcal Disease in children in Bangladesh

Accelerated Development and Introduction Plans (ADIPs) for Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccines: Burden of Pneumococcal Disease in children in Bangladesh
October 2, 2016 No Comments »

Funded by GAVI | 2004-2008 What? We have conducted this to enhance laboratory capacity to isolate and characterize S. pneumoniae in Bangladesh for documenting the contribution of pneumococci as causes of severe disease in children, to provide ... Read More »

Surveillance of Invasive Bacterial Diseases in Bangladesh

Surveillance of Invasive Bacterial Diseases in Bangladesh
October 2, 2016 No Comments »

Funded by WHO | 2009-2015 What? Considering the need of surveillance for invasive bacterial diseases, with specific attention to vaccine preventable diseases, we are conducting surveillance in 4 hospital and 1 rural field site of Bangladesh to ... Read More »

Maternal recto-vaginal and colonization of GBS & its association with early onset of neonatal sepsis

October 2, 2016 No Comments »

What? Within the cohort study, we are conducting a cross-sectional study to determine the prevalence of maternal vaginal or rectal colonization of GBS during pregnancy (≥ 30 weeks of gestational age and during delivery) and the vertical ... Read More »

Aetiology of Neonatal Infections in South Asia (ANISA)

Aetiology of Neonatal Infections in South Asia (ANISA)
October 2, 2016 No Comments »

This project will determine the population-based incidence, aetiology and antibiotic resistance profiles of community-acquired young infant infections in Bangladesh, India and Pakistan using community-based surveillance and standard and new diagnostic tests.